‘We’re not going to change it’: ‘Not to change what you do’ June 19, 2021 June 19, 2021 admin

In the days after the fatal shootings of three men in Tasmania’s north on Monday night, Tasmanian Greens leader Sam Dastyari told reporters that the party would not be changing its election platform.

“I don’t know if we can change what we’re doing.

We’re not the party of change,” he said.

Dastyari said it was “not our policy to change anything” as long as the party continued to support the policies that he and others had been advocating.

“We’re going to be the party that fights for the people of Tasmania and for the economy, for the environment, and we’ll be the one to fight for the safety of the people,” he told reporters.

Earlier on Monday, Dastyar told the ABC the party did not have any policy to support gun control measures.

“Our policy is not to change the things that we’ve been saying and doing over the last five years, and that’s what we stand for,” he added.

“It’s not to do anything about the firearms industry.”

Mr Dastyaris support for gun control has come under increasing scrutiny after the death of 19-year-old Andrew Jackson in Melbourne on Monday.

Mr Jackson’s father, a Tasmanian businessman, was also found dead inside the home in Woomera, a suburb of Melbourne, with gunshot wounds to the head.

He was reportedly found slumped in a bedroom with a pistol and a loaded .22 calibre revolver in his pocket.

Mr Jackson, who was an employee of the company he worked for, was a victim of a murder-suicide.

Mr Dashingaris son and one-time rival, former state premier Brad Hazzard, also died of a gunshot wound to the neck, and is believed to have been the killer.

Mr Hazzards death has sparked a fresh round of speculation over his family’s alleged links to gun violence.

Mr Jaspars son, who is a Tasmanians MP, was found dead in his car on Saturday, just days after he had reportedly admitted to having a gun in his possession.

Mr Burdon, a senior member of the Tasmanian Liberal Party, was shot dead outside a hotel in Sydney on Tuesday, while his brother, Andrew, was fatally shot in Sydney’s south-west.

The deaths of Mr Jackson and Mr Burdons death have sparked calls for a review of gun laws in the state.

A parliamentary committee is set to investigate whether the Tasmanians laws are adequate to prevent further killings.

Topics:deaths-and-accidents,gun-policy,criminology,tas